It’s the TRUMPazoid

I like Donald Trump. I don’t know if I will vote for him, undecided at this point. Still, his favorability rating with me is definitedly postitive.

I thought this was funny.

You have your “Bushies”, your “Clintonistas”, your “Paulians”, and now, your “TRUMPazoids!”

TRUMPAZOID

From the movie “Bustin Loose” starring Richard Pryor.

Pryor set himself on fire shortly after filming this movie.

Dont’t try this at home, kids.

It’s all in the Terms of Service

I never read the Terms of Service.

TOSI’ve scanned a few, but it always comes back to my not wanting to spend the time;  Plus the fact that they read like a Fund Prospectus, written by a Philadelphia lawyer:  dull, drab, and confusing.

This is America, after all.  We expect, demand, and in most instances receive the highest good faith from those that we deal with.  In fact, when the occasional bad apples are discovered, we expect them to be flushed from the pool with the simple act of exposing their misdeeds.  That’s the way we do business in the good old U.S. of A.

It shouldn’t be any different on the internet, but it is.  There are a lot more bad actors in this wild, wild west of commerce.  And, by not reading those pesky terms of service, I open myself up to their shenanigans, forfeiting whatever little may be left of my privacy, among other things.

But, this post isn’t about my lackadaisical approach to reading the fine print on commercial websites.  It’s about an idea I’ve been playing with in my mind for a few weeks now, and has only recently come to head in two unrelated cyber places:  Facebook, and GoFundMe.

In the first case, a FB friend of mine, Thomas Lipscomb was banned from FB with no explanation.  Questions to FB administration were unanswered, with a closing response of, “this decision is final,”  no appeal, no explanation, nothing.  No one is questioning that Facebook has the right to do what they did.  It’s all in the Terms of Service, you see.  Thomas, just like everyone else on FB must agree to those terms of service, or they will not be allowed to play.

The second case came about after the arrests of six Baltimore police officers.  Some well-meaning people started a campaign to raise money for defense costs at GoFundMe.  After a number of complaints by the politically correct crowd, the admins at GFM took down the site.  They shut down the fundraising campaign  in less than one hour, citing their right to do so, yada yada yada, in accordance with the Terms of Service.  And, just so you know, you MUST agree to abide by the Terms of Service, or you cannot enjoy the privileges of membership.

This practice isn’t exclusive to FB and GFM.  In fact, it is standard practice on the commercial internet.

The idea that has been swimming around my mind goes like this:  If commercial websites are allowed to pick and choose with whom they will interact, and if such practices are justified by the fine print in the Terms of Service, then why can’t brick and mortar firms be allowed to do the same thing?

If, for example, a Christian baker were to have carefully crafted TOS posted on their physical premises (or on their websites), in which they state unequivocally that any potential customer must agree to abide with the TOS prior to making a service request, well, you see where I’m going here. They could simply point to the TOS any time they want to, with or without explanation, it would make no difference.  No difference at all.

As a disclaimer, I am not a lawyer, nor have I played one on TV.  But, I did stay at a Holiday Inn recently.  (BTW,  I read the Terms of Service posted on the door of my room).

see also: One Way Contracts:

Sure Doesn’t Feel Like 7.8%

I don’t care as much about what people say as I care about what they do.

The reality is the U6 still remains at 14.7% and that is how it feels.

The $3000 Thingamajig

The President needs to stick to something he knows about — like stopping the oceans from rising.

I’m afraid there’s a better than average chance that the economy-thing is not going to work out well at all.

The latest evidence: The $3000 Thingamajig …..

Types of Investment Fraud

Various types of investment and forex fraud have seen a growth in occurrence recently. In part, this growth in financial crime may be due to harder economic times. It may also be facilitated by the growing opportunities for scammers presented by the widespread use of the Internet by the general public and the recent popularity of online forex trading.

Nevertheless, some of these investment frauds are more commonly committed by corporate officers, accountants or by high-pressure sales staff offering easy-to-manipulate stocks over the telephone. Some of the more common investment fraud types are described further below.

  • Corporate Fraud – Fraud committed by high ranking corporate officers, like those at Refco and Enron, can cost investors dearly by overvaluing the price of a stock.

  • Accounting Fraud – A number of major accounting firms have been charged with or admitted being negligent in preventing and identifying falsified financial reports published by corporate clients. These reports can mislead investors as to their client’s financial status and the value of their stock as an investment.

  • Insider Trading – When a corporation’s stock is traded by one of its officers or key employees, or even by large shareholders or relatives, who does so based on secret information that they came across while performing their job for the corporation, this can constitute illegal insider trading.

  • Microcap Fraud – Microcap stocks are those of smaller companies that have a market capitalization of less than $250 million. Since they often trade at low prices, they usually fall into the penny stock category and have values less than $5 per share. Also, because they do not trade publically on major exchanges, their stock price can be readily manipulated. This type of fraud occurs when microcap stocks are sold to the public fraudulently, often as part of a pump and dump scheme that might involve an Internet scam or boiler room.

  • Boiler Rooms – When stock brokerages place excessive pressure on clients to trade over the telephone, they are sometimes known as boiler rooms or houses. Often they are used in conjunction with the perpetration of microcap frauds that may involve the sale of non-existent, distressed or unfairly marked-up stock.

  • Pump and Dump – This type of investment fraud typically involves thinly-traded microcap stocks and entails making false and misleadingly positive statements in order to unnaturally inflate the price of a stock owned by the maker of such statements. Once the stock price rises as fraudulently-swayed investors buy the stock, the fraudster then dumps their over-valued shares. This subsequently causes the stock’s price to fall and investors to lose out.

  • Abusive Naked Short Selling – The fraudulent practice of abusive naked short selling involves selling stock without it actually being borrowed and without having any intent to borrow the stock.

  • Short and Distort – Sometimes individuals spread false or misleading information about corporations in order to cause a decline in their stock prices so they can be purchased or repurchased cheaply. This investment fraud is often called “short and distort.”

  • Ponzi Schemes – Ponzi schemes generally involve fraudulent investment or forex funds, some of which consist of High Yield Investment Plans or HYIPs. In general, these frauds finance withdrawals and payouts with funds from subsequent investors instead of with profits gained from their claimed investments.

Types of Investment Fraud

Stimulus results? $340,000 per job

The Obama administration is crowing about the success of their largest-ever stimulus package, claiming some 1 million jobs either created or saved.
chart_job_stimulus.03

Taking out my trusty calculator, I see that 1,000,000 jobs are being claimed at a cost of some $340,000,000,000….

Put another way, each of those jobs came at a cost of $340,000.

How’s that hope and change working for ya’?

Who didn’t see this coming?

The AP is reporting that Obama administration officials have been cooking the books in reporting job growth as a result of stimulus spending.

Cooking the books? I’m shocked! (not)

The AP review found some counts were more than 10 times as high as the actual number of jobs; some jobs credited to the stimulus program were counted two and sometimes more than four times; and other jobs were credited to stimulus spending when none was produced. link

How’s that hopenchange working for ya?

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