Mr. Trump’s Mandate

An interesting moment in last night’s CNN Townhall with GOP candidate Donald J. Trump occurred during his discussion of Obamacare, and his plans for an alternate health care strategy.  Let’s cut to the video:

 

The most contentious provision of Obamacare is the mandate that everyone be covered or be subject to a fine.  In fact, the legal gymnastics undergone by Chief Justice John Roberts that the mandate was actually a tax, and therefore legal, has provided Mr. Trump with the basis for his criticism of Ted Cruz as the erstwhile sponsor of Roberts during the nomination hearings.

But, here we are, in Donald’s own words saying, “I LIKE THE MANDATE.” (emphasis mine).  I asked a FB friend and true Trump believer about this, and he denied Trump said anything of the kind.  IKR.

cruz-or-loseA truly been a remarkable primary season, indeed.

 

This is the World Famous Friday Open Thread:  A Free Speech Zone.

 

WFFOT:  #CruzOrLose

 

 

 

NFL has more integrity than Mainstream Media

Poor ol’ Brian Stropolo.  He posted pictures of himself at a New Orleans Saints pre-season tailgate party on Facebook.  ESPN found out and told on him.  Rightly so, I believe.  Especially since he was supposed to officiate a Saints game.

At least the NFL had the integrity to remove  him.  The NFL pulled him from the game to avoid the appearance of impropriety.

You probably heard about it.

Now I know that politics is nowhere near as important as professional football.  So, I guess I’m not real surprised to see this story at Fox News.

A CNN political reporter last week tweeted a link to a fundraising page for the Obama campaign — one selling tickets for as much as $5,000 for a Milwaukee, Wis., reception. 

But, still.  Seriously CNN?  You care nothing about the appearance of impropriety?
When asked, CNN didn’t even respond.

And it only took them 18 years

The LA Times has discovered that Bill Clinton is a liar.

Pigs fly.

Heh™

Clinton Claim in Whitman ad is false

Early poll gives Kerry the edge in final debate

Thursday, October 14, 2004

TEMPE, Arizona (CNN) — Sen. John Kerry appeared to gain more momentum heading toward November 2, easily beating President Bush in the third and final debate, a poll taken late Wednesday night suggests.

A CNN/USA Today/Gallup snap poll taken immediately after the presidential debate found that respondents gave a significant edge to Kerry over Bush, 52 percent to 39 percent. …

“I think tonight that Americans saw someone who’s ready to be commander in chief,” said Mary Beth Cahill, Kerry’s campaign manager.

“Someone who has plans for where he wants to lead this country. I think that he did extraordinarily well and he delivered a faithful and optimistic vision of where the country can go in the future.”

The apparent Kerry “victory” is just SEARED into my memory. Heh

Showdown in Austin

hillaryobama.jpgAUSTIN, Texas (CNN)It’s showdown time in Texas.

The Democratic race was very different when the candidates debated three weeks ago.

Sens. Hillary Clinton of New York and Barack Obama of Illinois will face off in a Democratic presidential debate in Austin Thursday.

The debate, to be held on the campus of the University of Texas, will air live on CNN.

If words are as important as candidate Obama asserts, hopefully the CNN mods will take advantage of this historic opportunity to focus less on the ‘horse-race’ and the campaign rhetoric, and more on finding out what the candidates really mean.

Betsy McCaughey, former Lt Gov of New York, has penned several interesting questions regarding one of the major issues in the Democratic primary — universal healthcare.

1) Sen. Clinton: When you pledge to cover every one of the 47 million uninsured, do you include recent and future newcomers to the United States, legal and illegal?

2) Sen. Obama: You have said that you will require all parents to have health insurance for their children. What will you do to enforce this law?

3) Sen. Clinton: a question about young adults. They think of themselves as invincible and are not apt to buy insurance. Your “mandate” would force them to do so, and more than that, to pay the same premium as middle aged people whose health care needs generally are much greater. You defend the one-price rule as “shared responsibility,” but isn’t it an unjust, hidden tax on the younger generation?

4) Sen. Obama: You have pledged to make health insurance “affordable.” Texas lawmakers have made insurance less affordable by requiring that every plan include in vitro fertilization, acupuncture, marriage counseling and some 50 other features. This is like passing a law saying that the only car you’re permitted to buy is a fully loaded luxury sedan.

Would you allow Texans (and all of us who live in states with similarly costly insurance requirements) to shop for cheaper insurance outside our own state?

5) Sen. Clinton: You promise that “everyone who is already insured will be able to keep the coverage they have today.” Yet your proposal says all health plans must cover services “experts deem necessary.”

About 4.5 million people have high-deductible insurance, because it costs less and allows them to make their own decisions about where and when to get medical care. But when Massachusetts passed mandatory health insurance, people with high-deductible plans were forced to switch to more expensive medical policies to meet that state’s definition of insurance.

Will that also happen under your proposal?

6) Sens. Obama and Clinton: Some doctors and hospitals are worried about your plans to make electronic record-keeping compulsory. What will be the penalty for a doctor who doesn’t get computerized?

7) Sens. Obama and Clinton: Both your proposals call for limits on the profit margins of insurance companies. Attacking the most unpopular industry in America may sound politically attractive, but if profit margins are legally capped, investors will flee to other industries and private insurance could become a thing of the past. That would leave only a government-run health-care system.

Do you believe the nation should take that risk?

Would Ronald Reagan endorse your candidacy?

Absolutely the best response of the evening, and Mike Huckabee knocked it out of the park:

HUCKABEE:

huck2.jpgI think it would be incredibly presumptuous and even arrogant for me to try to suggest what Ronald Reagan would do, that he would endorse any of us against the others.

Let me just say this, I’m not going to pretend he would endorse me. I wish he would. I would love that, but I endorse him, and I’m going to tell you why.

It wasn’t just his specific policies, but Ronald Reagan was something more than just a policy wonk. He was a man who loved this country, and he inspired this country to believe in itself again.

What made Ronald Reagan a great president was not just the intricacies of his policies, though they were good policies. It was that he loved America and saw it as a good nation and a great nation because of the greatness of its people.

And if we can recapture that, that’s when we recapture the Reagan spirit. It’s that spirit that has a can-do attitude about America’s futures and that makes us love our country whether we’re Democrats or Republicans. And that’s what I believe Ronald Reagan did — he brought this country back together and made us believe in ourselves.

And whether he believes in us, I hope we still believe in those things which made him a great leader and a great American.

Huckabee could go a long way towards rebuilding the Reagan coalition by offering the VP slot to Mitt Romney. It could work.

Reagan Library GOP Debate

Not a bad showing for the four candidates. Well, three. I like Ron Paul, he seems like a nice old man, and pretty smart. But his foreign policy creds are scary, and he is not a serious candidate.

The questions were weighted heavily toward Romney and McCain. At least 4 to 1, I haven’t counted, but it sure seemed that way. Plus, there was someone who would interrupt Huckabee on his few responses. I don’t know if it was Anderson Cooper, or someone else close to a microphone, but it was clearly an attempt to cut him off, when CNN had begun the night saying they would allow each candidate to give full answers without a clock.

The final question of the night, “Would Ronald Reagan endorse your candidacy?”

Huck hit it out of the park. Hopefully it will be up on youtube soon. I’ll post it when available.

Update:  CNN has posted the transcript
AP has more

Huckabee–the big winner

All in all: Huckabee gained ground, McCain probably lost ground, and Romney didn’t help or hurt himself – although he did effectively defend himself. McCain sounded petty – and that’s not the McCain voters know and like.

But to the extent that Huckabee may have made any gains from his performance, Romney’s got bigger worries out of tonight than the Arizona senator. – CNN Senior Political Analyst Bill Schneider

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